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  • Craniocerebral trauma related road accidents in Guinea: Impact of delay to access to healthcare and the ability to finance care on length of hospital stay and hospital mortality.

    Final Number:
    1701

    Authors:
    Kezely Beavogui MD; Akoi Koivogui; Diankanagbe Camara; Vamala Guilavogui; Zeze Beavogui, Koue Goumou, Lamine Fantal Kaba, Rougui Diallo

    Study Design:
    Other

    Subject Category:

    Meeting: Congress of Neurological Surgeons 2013 Annual Meeting

    Introduction: To analyze the impact of time management and the ability to fund trauma care on length of stay and hospital mortality.

    Methods: The data from this study are those of a cross-sectional study on the public highway accidents occurred in 2009 in Guinea (Béavogui et al. 2012).

    Results: The study involved a sample of 2576 patients with a mean age of 26.8 ± 12.8 yr. With a male predominance, the age difference between male and female gender was statistically significant. Univariate analysis showed an increased risk of having a long length of stay in patients admitted after the first 6 hours or after the first 12 hours after the accident. After eight days of hospitalization, 99 patients died, an estimated 3.8% for 2009 hospital mortality. 37.4% of deaths occurred within the first 3 days of hospitalization, 33.3% between the third and tenth day of hospitalization. This varied united analysis shows a significant association between hospital mortality and admission period and the ability to finance care. When TCE is open, the risk of death was 2.6 times higher. This risk was 16 times higher in patients with three clinical signs of TCE compared to those who had only one. Similarly, moderate coma and severe, the presence of at least three signs the spinal injury were risk factors for mortality TCE. The risk of having a long duration of hospital stay was significantly increased with age, unrelated to sex. By cons, age and gender are not predictive of lethality. This finding converges with the results of Rapenne et al. (1997), although they are interested in short-term mortality in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Conclusions: Severe head injuries are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the Republic of Guinea. Limited care means make excessive mortality. Improving this situation requires an active prevention policy by administrative authorities and greater efficiency of medical care

    Patient Care: Severe head injuries are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the Republic of Guinea. Limited care means make excessive mortality. Improving this situation requires an active prevention policy by administrative authorities and greater efficiency of medical care

    Learning Objectives: : To analyze the impact of time management and the ability to fund trauma care on length of stay and hospital mortality.

    References:

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